As you can see below, the road to Portal over the Chiricahua mountains was a bit rough but my RAV4 had no problems.  In some areas, it was interesting to see large numbers of trees with blackened bark from previous wildfires coming back to life with new growth.

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After I checked in at the Portal Peak Lodge, I went for a walk into ‘town’ – one short street with the library, post office and several houses. The welcoming committee was there having a drink at a very large puddle. These javelinas are part of a larger herd of about 20 individuals that live in the area.

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One of the houses in town is owned by friends of the group and we were invited to visit their yard where they have multiple bird feeders and a large number of feathered visitors.

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Happy Hour was as sumptuose as usual and gave us time to share our experinces of the day.

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After we had our fill of goodies, you may notice that there is not an inch of empty space on the table, we went to dinner, and then on to our search for critters of the night. The drive was not very productive this year.

To be continued . . .

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After more than 6 years of living in Tucson, I finally got around to doing something I had wanted to do since I got here – explore the Southwest.

The idea for this excursion came about as the annual ASDM Friday Docents and Friends trip to Portal, AZ was scheduled, so I thought why not extend the trip a bit more. Since I was already going to the SE corner of Arizona, I decided to go North from there.

I left Tucson early on Monday, and instead of driving to Portal with the group, I struck out on my own and attempted to visit Fort Bowie National Historic Site and actually visited the Chiricahua National Monument.

The trip to Fort Bowie was a disappointment because I could not find the road in!!! One is supposed to park at the trailhead (did that) and hike a 3 mile loop that would take you to various historically interesting places (did not do that). Since I was alone, basically in the middle of nowhere, and the only living things I saw on the way in were a couple of cows, a raven and a couple of unidentified raptors, I decided that hiking alone was not a good idea – just in case.

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I looked for the ADA accessible road (at my age, I am entitled to use that road) that takes you to the Visitor Center, but I could not find it. Also since it was Monday, and the VC is only open on Saturdays and Sundays, I could not call them (even if I had a cell phone signal) and get directions.  I decided to call it a day and head on to the Chiricahua National Monument.

I drove south on SR186 with the Dos Cabezas mountain range and eventually the Chiricahuas on my left, and open grassland to my right. Magnificent scenery! 

Chiricahua National Monument is a fee-free park and right next to the former fee booth at the entrance is a very small and charming old cemetery.

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The drive to the Visitor Center was lovely, but my goodness, the drive to the Masaai Point, even in the rain was incredibly beautiful and impressive. I had seen pictures of this area before, but none of them did it justice, don’t even know if it is possible to capture how incredible the stone formations are. No pictures – it was raining! 

The view from Massai point is quite sensational. I had a picnic in my car waiting out the rain and watching a thunder and lightning show south of my location. After the rain, I managed to get some images.

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When I left the Monument, I headed south then east over the Chiracahuas on the mountain road to Portal.  The road was a bit rough, but passable.  My trusty RAV-4 had no problems fording streams and bumping along in order to reach Portal in time for our famous Happy Hour at the Portal Lodge with my friends.

To be continued . . .

(ps – no matter how artistically I arrange the images in the draft, they have a mind of their own and rearrange themselves when the blog is published)


 

Wrote an entire post about the snow we had to celebrate both the State of Arizona’s 100th birthday and Valentine’s Day, both on February 14th. 

Unfortunately, WordPress ate my oh so very insightful comments and I am not inspired to write them again. 

So for your enjoyment, without too many words to distract you from the beautiful scenery, here are some images of the Tucson Mountains viewed from the Visitor Center at Saguaro National Park West.

Enjoy!


Sunset at Saguaro National Park West

Another year begins and I still have to figure out where the last one went – and that is a good thing.  It means, to me at least, that I was busy doing things I enjoyed, that I was not too idle, but idle enough at times to enjoy my surroundings, and that I am still interested in learning and open to new experiences. 

It also means that I am physically (mostly, must have a talk with my knees) and mentally able to do them.  I have been lucky to meet and make friends with people from all over the country and the world with an incredible and varied amount of interest and knowledge about things I never knew.  And I am able to share some of my knowledge and experiences with others.

One question that I often heard before retirement was “what are you going to do with all that free time?”  My answer always was, to the beffudlement of some, “would you like to see my list?”.  A few did nod their heads in agreement, they knew exactly what I was talking about, but others could not understand.

Retirement is a hard earned status, you work all your life to get there.  It is not, does not have to be, the end of a productive life.  On the contrary, it is an opportunity to begin catching up with a multitude of things that were never done or tried because of the many obligations one has during ones lifetime.

It is a curious thing.  As time goes by and things on that list are accomplished, the list grows longer instead of shorter.  In reality, I have not gotten around to do many of the things I had originally planned to do.  Instead, I have found a whole lot of other things to do.    New experiences, exposure to new people, all seem to add multiple new things to look forward to for every one item crossed off that list.

As a matter of fact, I have been so busy that I am now on a three week vacation from retirement.  Looking forward to getting back to ‘work’!


Or at least, winter as defined in Southern Arizona, but my down jacket came out from the depths of my closet. 

The weather forecast for last Friday predicted a 60% chance of rain and high winds, so I took my potted plants down from the fence and surrounded them by patio chairs to prevent the javelinas from feasting on them.   The dire predictions had not materialized by bed time – no clouds, no rain, no wind – and I happily went to bed thinking the weatherman had been wrong.

Sometime around 2AM, the wind woke me up.  This house is not very tight, and I could hear the wind whistling as it found its way down the chimney and through a few cracks in the wall. 

Then the rains came.  I was nice and warm in my bed and decided not to get up to check for anything going wrong at that time.  I was also greatly relieved to find out in the morning that nothing of importance had blown away in the storm.

After a few clouds Saturday morning, the day turned out to be glorious!  A perfect Fall day (for Vermont) that had all the local residents shivering in their shoes.  The wind died down and the sun was shining brightly, but the temperatures never went higher than the mid – 60’s.   

I spent the day outdoors at a craft fair in a lovely park, surrounded by trees.  When I left the house early in the morning, I thought that in typical Tucson fashion, it would get hot during the day, so I put on a long sleeve cotton top and took my down jacket ‘just in case’, but drew the line at wearing wool socks.  I must admit that I actually felt cold, even wearing my down jacket, standing in the shade of those trees.  I kept looking for the sunny spots in the park, something unheard of in this part of the world, where everyone is constantly looking for a shady spot. 

I must remember the clothing ‘mantra’ from up north – layers, layers, layers – so you can peel off and add on during the day as needed.

This morning is overcast, really and truly overcast, not just a few clouds in the sky.  WeatherBug says it is 49F degrees outside, 79% humidity, with an expected high between 61F and 66F, and 40% chance of rain for tomorrow. 

Am I in Southern Arizona?


‘snakes’ run from both ends of the house to the blockage (about 80 feet one way), down a side line to take care of the problem in the second bathroom, several phone calls and a house ‘colonoscopy’, the tentative diagnosis is not good. 

It appears, after they ran a camera into the bowels of the plumbing system, that there may be a break in the main line that takes waste water out into the sewer system.  Then they used a beeping sci-fi rifle looking contraption with 2 large balls on the barrel to locate the problem.  Of course, the break has been located buried in the slab under my one-year old saltillo floors, about a foot from my bed.

The solution is to break through the saltillo and the concrete slab to get access to the area and replace the pipe – 3 days of work, not including replacing the floor tiles.  I am now waiting to get an estimate. 

At least the rest of the plumbing in the rest of the house is working normally.


. . . the bane of my existance!

When I lived ‘up North’, over a period of about 30 years I experienced the joys of burst pipes in winter, leaking air conditioning drip pan in the attic, leaking hot water heater, water heater blowing a gasket and a number of more mundane plumbing related events.  Since the weather is so much milder in this area, I thought my encounters with plumbers would be much reduced.

For the third time (actually, the fourth time if we count the burst water pipe in the carport due to freezing temperatures last winter) in a year, I have had to call a plumber to the house.  The house is not new, and except for the master bathroom, it still has all the original plumbing.  Well, guess which area of the house is the one that has given me the most headaches. Yes, the newly-renovated-about-10-plus-years-ago master bathroom.

Perhaps because the master bathroom is at the opposite end of a long house from where the main line joins the sewer system, this is the second time any and all water from any and all appliances in that bathroom has refused to go down the drain, and has actually started to come up where it should not be coming up.  Not to be left behind, the shower drain in the other bathroom was very, very sluggish.  Suffice it to say, it was not a fun day and I will spare you the details.

Thankfully, the home repair insurance company was able to find an ’emergency plumber’ who made an appearance with a somewhat reluctant assistant, about 3 hours after I called.  He really seemed to know what he was doing.  After sacrificing my kitchen rubber gloves to a higher cause, he went into action right away.   He ran a ‘snake’ from the master bathroom down the line until it found resistance.  After he was done, all water was running smoothly down every single drain.  

Is this a story with a happy ending?  Not at all, the patient required more testing since the water from both bathroom showers stopped draining the following morning.  More to come . . .